SILO 1

Silo 1 | OPEN BERTH

  • Depth alongside: 40’ + at low tide
  • Access draft: – BW
  • Max LOA: 230
  • Max Beam: 38
  • Airdraft: 21 m
  • Tide restriction: Yes
  • Night Arrival / Sailing restriction: No
  • Method of loading: elevator/belts
  • Working hours: M/F 0700-1900 Sat 0700 – 1300
  • Overtime: Sat 1300 to Mon 0700 M/F 1900-0700
  • Loading rate: 500 tph
  • Bunkers: A/l
  • Fresh Water: Yes
  • Garbage collection compulsory: No
  • Others: Swell restrictions. Towage compulsory.

Location

Province of Buenos Aires
“B” Category Port
At the mouth of Quequén river, Quequén is on the east side and Necochea is on the west.
Lat 38º35.5 S Long 58º42 0 W
Charts Arg H-200. 252, 253 BA Charts 531, 556, 3065

The cities of Quequén and Necochea constitute an urban conglomerate of 75,000 inhabitants divided by the Quequén Grande river: Necochea is an important tourist resort, and during the summer season, the population is greatly increased. There is an intense commercial activity as the city is in the middle of one of the richest farming areas in the country. There are also important agro-industrial plants (vegetable oil and seeds by-products) and fish processing plants. AIso, there is a medium-sized agriculture equipment industry. The area has good road access and is connected by Highways Nº55, 86, 88 and 228. The city is served by the Ferrosur Roca railway and there is a small airport for medium sized airplanes working domestic routes.

Port general description:

The port is situated at the mouth of the river Quequén. Necochea occupies the right bank and Quequén, the left bank. In 1997, 326 ocean-going vessels called. Trade consists mainly of exports of wheat to Brazil, with important quantities of maize, sunflower seed pellets and vegetable oil, which are exported elsewhere. A total of 5.1 million ton of grain and agricultural by-products were exported in 1997, including approximately 2.9 million ton wheat, 1.5 million ton maize, 350.000 ton sunflower pellets and 400.000 ton sun oil. The activities of the fishing fleet result in the subsequent export of frozen fish mostly to Italy and Spain, which in 1997 totalled 27.000 ton. Shipments of wood chips are made to Japan and in 1997, they totalled 179.000 ton. Imports are almost entirely confined to the reception of bulk fertilisers, which in 1997 amounted to 239.000 ton.

SILO 10

Silo 10 | OPEN BERTH

  • Depth alongside: 39’ + at low tide
  • Access draft: – BW
  • Max LOA: 200
  • Max Beam: 32
  • Airdraft: 21 m
  • Tide restriction: Yes
  • Night Arrival / Sailing restriction: No
  • Method of loading: shore conveyors belts/ grabs
  • Working hours: M/F 0700-1900 Sat 0700 – 1300
  • Overtime: Sat 1300 to Mon 0700 M/F 1900-0700
  • Loading rate: 1900 tph
  • Bunkers: A/l
  • Fresh Water: Yes
  • Garbage collection compulsory: No
  • Others: Swell restrictions. Towage compulsory.
  • Others:

Location

Province of Buenos Aires
“B” Category Port
At the mouth of Quequén river, Quequén is on the east side and Necochea is on the west.
Lat 38º35.5 S Long 58º42 0 W
Charts Arg H-200. 252, 253 BA Charts 531, 556, 3065

The cities of Quequén and Necochea constitute an urban conglomerate of 75,000 inhabitants divided by the Quequén Grande river: Necochea is an important tourist resort, and during the summer season, the population is greatly increased. There is an intense commercial activity as the city is in the middle of one of the richest farming areas in the country. There are also important agro-industrial plants (vegetable oil and seeds by-products) and fish processing plants. AIso, there is a medium-sized agriculture equipment industry. The area has good road access and is connected by Highways Nº55, 86, 88 and 228. The city is served by the Ferrosur Roca railway and there is a small airport for medium sized airplanes working domestic routes.

Port general description:

The port is situated at the mouth of the river Quequén. Necochea occupies the right bank and Quequén, the left bank. In 1997, 326 ocean-going vessels called. Trade consists mainly of exports of wheat to Brazil, with important quantities of maize, sunflower seed pellets and vegetable oil, which are exported elsewhere. A total of 5.1 million ton of grain and agricultural by-products were exported in 1997, including approximately 2.9 million ton wheat, 1.5 million ton maize, 350.000 ton sunflower pellets and 400.000 ton sun oil. The activities of the fishing fleet result in the subsequent export of frozen fish mostly to Italy and Spain, which in 1997 totalled 27.000 ton. Shipments of wood chips are made to Japan and in 1997, they totalled 179.000 ton. Imports are almost entirely confined to the reception of bulk fertilisers, which in 1997 amounted to 239.000 ton.

SILO 3

Terminal Quequen Silo 3 | Terminal Quequén S.A.

  • Depth alongside: 40’ + at low tide
  • Access draft: – BW
  • Max LOA: 230
  • Max Beam: 38
  • Airdraft: 18 m
  • Tide restriction: Yes
  • Night Arrival / Sailing restriction: No
  • Method of loading: elevator/belts
  • Working hours: M/F 0700-1900 Sat 0700 – 1300
  • Overtime: Sat 1300 to Mon 0700 M/F 1900-0700
  • Loading rate: 1500 tph
  • Bunkers: A/l
  • Fresh Water: Yes
  • Garbage collection compulsory: No
  • Others: Swell restrictions. Towage compulsory.

Location

Province of Buenos Aires
“B” Category Port
At the mouth of Quequén river, Quequén is on the east side and Necochea is on the west.
Lat 38º35.5 S Long 58º42 0 W
Charts Arg H-200. 252, 253 BA Charts 531, 556, 3065

The cities of Quequén and Necochea constitute an urban conglomerate of 75,000 inhabitants divided by the Quequén Grande river: Necochea is an important tourist resort, and during the summer season, the population is greatly increased. There is an intense commercial activity as the city is in the middle of one of the richest farming areas in the country. There are also important agro-industrial plants (vegetable oil and seeds by-products) and fish processing plants. AIso, there is a medium-sized agriculture equipment industry. The area has good road access and is connected by Highways Nº55, 86, 88 and 228. The city is served by the Ferrosur Roca railway and there is a small airport for medium sized airplanes working domestic routes.

Port general description:

The port is situated at the mouth of the river Quequén. Necochea occupies the right bank and Quequén, the left bank. In 1997, 326 ocean-going vessels called. Trade consists mainly of exports of wheat to Brazil, with important quantities of maize, sunflower seed pellets and vegetable oil, which are exported elsewhere. A total of 5.1 million ton of grain and agricultural by-products were exported in 1997, including approximately 2.9 million ton wheat, 1.5 million ton maize, 350.000 ton sunflower pellets and 400.000 ton sun oil. The activities of the fishing fleet result in the subsequent export of frozen fish mostly to Italy and Spain, which in 1997 totalled 27.000 ton. Shipments of wood chips are made to Japan and in 1997, they totalled 179.000 ton. Imports are almost entirely confined to the reception of bulk fertilisers, which in 1997 amounted to 239.000 ton.

SILO 4/5

Terminal Quequen Silo 4/5 | Terminal Quequen S.A.

  • Depth alongside: 40’ + at low tide
  • Access draft: – BW
  • Max LOA: 230
  • Max Beam: 38
  • Airdraft: 18 m
  • Tide restriction: Yes
  • Night Arrival / Sailing restriction: No
  • Method of loading: elevator/belts
  • Working hours: M/F 0700-1900 Sat 0700 – 1300
  • Overtime: Sat 1300 to Mon 0700 M/F 1900-0700
  • Loading rate: 1900 tph
  • Bunkers: A/l
  • Fresh Water: Yes
  • Garbage collection compulsory: No
  • Others: Swell restrictions. Towage compulsory.
  • Others:

Location

Province of Buenos Aires
“B” Category Port
At the mouth of Quequén river, Quequén is on the east side and Necochea is on the west.
Lat 38º35.5 S Long 58º42 0 W
Charts Arg H-200. 252, 253 BA Charts 531, 556, 3065

The cities of Quequén and Necochea constitute an urban conglomerate of 75,000 inhabitants divided by the Quequén Grande river: Necochea is an important tourist resort, and during the summer season, the population is greatly increased. There is an intense commercial activity as the city is in the middle of one of the richest farming areas in the country. There are also important agro-industrial plants (vegetable oil and seeds by-products) and fish processing plants. AIso, there is a medium-sized agriculture equipment industry. The area has good road access and is connected by Highways Nº55, 86, 88 and 228. The city is served by the Ferrosur Roca railway and there is a small airport for medium sized airplanes working domestic routes.

Port general description:

The port is situated at the mouth of the river Quequén. Necochea occupies the right bank and Quequén, the left bank. In 1997, 326 ocean-going vessels called. Trade consists mainly of exports of wheat to Brazil, with important quantities of maize, sunflower seed pellets and vegetable oil, which are exported elsewhere. A total of 5.1 million ton of grain and agricultural by-products were exported in 1997, including approximately 2.9 million ton wheat, 1.5 million ton maize, 350.000 ton sunflower pellets and 400.000 ton sun oil. The activities of the fishing fleet result in the subsequent export of frozen fish mostly to Italy and Spain, which in 1997 totalled 27.000 ton. Shipments of wood chips are made to Japan and in 1997, they totalled 179.000 ton. Imports are almost entirely confined to the reception of bulk fertilisers, which in 1997 amounted to 239.000 ton.

SILO 6

Silo 6 | Terminal Quequen S.A.

  • Depth alongside: 36’ + at low tide
  • Access draft: – BW
  • Max LOA: 200
  • Max Beam: 32
  • Airdraft: 14 m
  • Tide restriction: Yes
  • Night Arrival / Sailing restriction: No
  • Method of loading: shore conveyors /belts
  • Working hours: M/F 0700-1900 Sat 0700 – 1300
  • Overtime: Sat 1300 to Mon 0700 M/F 1900-0700
  • Loading rate: 1900 tph
  • Bunkers: A/l
  • Fresh Water: Yes
  • Garbage collection compulsory: No
  • Others: Swell restrictions. Towage compulsory.

Location

Province of Buenos Aires
“B” Category Port
At the mouth of Quequén river, Quequén is on the east side and Necochea is on the west.
Lat 38º35.5 S Long 58º42 0 W
Charts Arg H-200. 252, 253 BA Charts 531, 556, 3065

The cities of Quequén and Necochea constitute an urban conglomerate of 75,000 inhabitants divided by the Quequén Grande river: Necochea is an important tourist resort, and during the summer season, the population is greatly increased. There is an intense commercial activity as the city is in the middle of one of the richest farming areas in the country. There are also important agro-industrial plants (vegetable oil and seeds by-products) and fish processing plants. AIso, there is a medium-sized agriculture equipment industry. The area has good road access and is connected by Highways Nº55, 86, 88 and 228. The city is served by the Ferrosur Roca railway and there is a small airport for medium sized airplanes working domestic routes.

Port general description:

The port is situated at the mouth of the river Quequén. Necochea occupies the right bank and Quequén, the left bank. In 1997, 326 ocean-going vessels called. Trade consists mainly of exports of wheat to Brazil, with important quantities of maize, sunflower seed pellets and vegetable oil, which are exported elsewhere. A total of 5.1 million ton of grain and agricultural by-products were exported in 1997, including approximately 2.9 million ton wheat, 1.5 million ton maize, 350.000 ton sunflower pellets and 400.000 ton sun oil. The activities of the fishing fleet result in the subsequent export of frozen fish mostly to Italy and Spain, which in 1997 totalled 27.000 ton. Shipments of wood chips are made to Japan and in 1997, they totalled 179.000 ton. Imports are almost entirely confined to the reception of bulk fertilisers, which in 1997 amounted to 239.000 ton.

TQ SILO 3

Terminal Quequen Silo 3 | Terminal Quequén S.A.

  • Alongside Draft (in feet): 38 + at Low Tide BW
  • Access draft: 40 00”
  • Max LOA: 230
  • Max Beam:
  • Airdraft: 21 m
  • Tide restriction: Yes
  • Night Arrival / Sailing restriction: No
  • Method of loading: Elevator /belts
  • Working hours: M/F 0700-1900 Sat 0700 – 1300
  • Overtime: Sat 1300 to Mon 0700 M/F 1900-0700
  • Loading rate: 1200 tph
  • Bunkers: No
  • Fresh Water: Yes
  • Garbage collection compulsory: No
  • Others: Swell restrictions. Towage compulsory.

Location

Province of Buenos Aires
“B” Category Port
At the mouth of Quequén river, Quequén is on the east side and Necochea is on the west.
Lat 38º35.5 S Long 58º42 0 W
Charts Arg H-200. 252, 253 BA Charts 531, 556, 3065

The cities of Quequén and Necochea constitute an urban conglomerate of 75,000 inhabitants divided by the Quequén Grande river: Necochea is an important tourist resort, and during the summer season, the population is greatly increased. There is an intense commercial activity as the city is in the middle of one of the richest farming areas in the country. There are also important agro-industrial plants (vegetable oil and seeds by-products) and fish processing plants. AIso, there is a medium-sized agriculture equipment industry. The area has good road access and is connected by Highways Nº55, 86, 88 and 228. The city is served by the Ferrosur Roca railway and there is a small airport for medium sized airplanes working domestic routes.

Port general description:

The port is situated at the mouth of the river Quequén. Necochea occupies the right bank and Quequén, the left bank. In 1997, 326 ocean-going vessels called. Trade consists mainly of exports of wheat to Brazil, with important quantities of maize, sunflower seed pellets and vegetable oil, which are exported elsewhere. A total of 5.1 million ton of grain and agricultural by-products were exported in 1997, including approximately 2.9 million ton wheat, 1.5 million ton maize, 350.000 ton sunflower pellets and 400.000 ton sun oil. The activities of the fishing fleet result in the subsequent export of frozen fish mostly to Italy and Spain, which in 1997 totalled 27.000 ton. Shipments of wood chips are made to Japan and in 1997, they totalled 179.000 ton. Imports are almost entirely confined to the reception of bulk fertilisers, which in 1997 amounted to 239.000 ton.

TQ SILO 4/5

Terminal Quequen Silo 4/5 | Terminal Quequén S.A.

  • Alongside Draft (in feet): 38 + at Low Tide BW
  • Access draft: 38 00” to 40 00”
  • Max LOA: 230
  • Max Beam:
  • Airdraft: 14 m
  • Tide restriction: Yes
  • Night Arrival / Sailing restriction: No
  • Method of loading: Elevator /belts
  • Working hours: M/F 0700-1900 Sat 0700 – 1300
  • Overtime: Sat 1300 to Mon 0700 M/F 1900-0700
  • Loading rate: 1200 tph
  • Bunkers: No
  • Fresh Water: Yes
  • Garbage collection compulsory: No
  • Others: Swell restrictions. Towage compulsory.

Location

Province of Buenos Aires
“B” Category Port
At the mouth of Quequén river, Quequén is on the east side and Necochea is on the west.
Lat 38º35.5 S Long 58º42 0 W
Charts Arg H-200. 252, 253 BA Charts 531, 556, 3065

The cities of Quequén and Necochea constitute an urban conglomerate of 75,000 inhabitants divided by the Quequén Grande river: Necochea is an important tourist resort, and during the summer season, the population is greatly increased. There is an intense commercial activity as the city is in the middle of one of the richest farming areas in the country. There are also important agro-industrial plants (vegetable oil and seeds by-products) and fish processing plants. AIso, there is a medium-sized agriculture equipment industry. The area has good road access and is connected by Highways Nº55, 86, 88 and 228. The city is served by the Ferrosur Roca railway and there is a small airport for medium sized airplanes working domestic routes.

Port general description:

The port is situated at the mouth of the river Quequén. Necochea occupies the right bank and Quequén, the left bank. In 1997, 326 ocean-going vessels called. Trade consists mainly of exports of wheat to Brazil, with important quantities of maize, sunflower seed pellets and vegetable oil, which are exported elsewhere. A total of 5.1 million ton of grain and agricultural by-products were exported in 1997, including approximately 2.9 million ton wheat, 1.5 million ton maize, 350.000 ton sunflower pellets and 400.000 ton sun oil. The activities of the fishing fleet result in the subsequent export of frozen fish mostly to Italy and Spain, which in 1997 totalled 27.000 ton. Shipments of wood chips are made to Japan and in 1997, they totalled 179.000 ton. Imports are almost entirely confined to the reception of bulk fertilisers, which in 1997 amounted to 239.000 ton.

TQ SILO 6

Terminal Quequen Silo 4/5 | Terminal Quequén S.A.

  • Alongside Draft (in feet): 38 + at Low Tide BW
  • Access draft: 38 00” to 40 00”
  • Max LOA: 230
  • Max Beam:
  • Airdraft: 14 m
  • Tide restriction: Yes
  • Night Arrival / Sailing restriction: No
  • Method of loading: Elevator /belts
  • Working hours: M/F 0700-1900 Sat 0700 – 1300
  • Overtime: Sat 1300 to Mon 0700 M/F 1900-0700
  • Loading rate: 1200 tph
  • Bunkers: No
  • Fresh Water: Yes
  • Garbage collection compulsory: No
  • Others: Swell restrictions. Towage compulsory.

Location

Province of Buenos Aires
“B” Category Port
At the mouth of Quequén river, Quequén is on the east side and Necochea is on the west.
Lat 38º35.5 S Long 58º42 0 W
Charts Arg H-200. 252, 253 BA Charts 531, 556, 3065

The cities of Quequén and Necochea constitute an urban conglomerate of 75,000 inhabitants divided by the Quequén Grande river: Necochea is an important tourist resort, and during the summer season, the population is greatly increased. There is an intense commercial activity as the city is in the middle of one of the richest farming areas in the country. There are also important agro-industrial plants (vegetable oil and seeds by-products) and fish processing plants. AIso, there is a medium-sized agriculture equipment industry. The area has good road access and is connected by Highways Nº55, 86, 88 and 228. The city is served by the Ferrosur Roca railway and there is a small airport for medium sized airplanes working domestic routes.

Port general description:

The port is situated at the mouth of the river Quequén. Necochea occupies the right bank and Quequén, the left bank. In 1997, 326 ocean-going vessels called. Trade consists mainly of exports of wheat to Brazil, with important quantities of maize, sunflower seed pellets and vegetable oil, which are exported elsewhere. A total of 5.1 million ton of grain and agricultural by-products were exported in 1997, including approximately 2.9 million ton wheat, 1.5 million ton maize, 350.000 ton sunflower pellets and 400.000 ton sun oil. The activities of the fishing fleet result in the subsequent export of frozen fish mostly to Italy and Spain, which in 1997 totalled 27.000 ton. Shipments of wood chips are made to Japan and in 1997, they totalled 179.000 ton. Imports are almost entirely confined to the reception of bulk fertilisers, which in 1997 amounted to 239.000 ton.